Five reasons black kitchens are best

Are we getting tired of the white kitchen? There is a long list of reasons why someone might choose a white kitchen but all that can also be said about a black kitchen too. With one major addition to the list; courage.

Why are black kitchens best?

  1. They are timeless and will stay current. A kitchen is a huge investment and not a renovation you want to tackle any more often than needed.
  2. The black kitchen is essentially a blank slate. Just like the little black dress it can be dressed up with fabrics, hardware and fixtures.
  3. It is versatile and will fit with any alterations to colour schemes in the rest of the decor.
  4. The black kitchen is elegant and unexpectedly sophisticated.
  5. The black kitchen is a gutsy choice. Come on, you know your dinner parties would be so much more interesting in a black kitchen.

 

black kitchen

decoholic.com

black kitchen

nytimes.com

black kitchen

martkleppe.nl

black kitchen

traditionalhome.com

black ikea kitchen

ikea.com

black vipp kitchen

vipp.com

black kitchen

gypsyyaya.com

black kitchen

architecturaldigest.com

black kitchen

sadecor.co.za

There are lots of factors to consider when contemplating a black kitchen;

  1. The type of material used for the cabinets. Laminate will be darker and more saturated than painted wood.
  2. The type of finish. Matte, satin, semi-gloss or high gloss all reflect or absorb light differently.
  3. A gloss finish will reflect light and be brighter overall but is higher maintenance.
  4. A matte finish will make a darker room but is more contemporary.
  5. Lighting considerations are crucial. Different levels of lighting from ambiance to task lighting have to be considered and you’ll need more than you think.
  6. There are many, many different shades of black from red black to a blue black.

I’m not sure I’m ready to take the plunge but I sure do love to look at these beauties and day dream.

Are you cross today?

It’s Monday and you might be feeling a bit cross, so here you go. I’m really late to the party on this one but I still find Swiss crosses used in interiors and anywhere else really appealing. The true Swiss cross is based on the Swiss flag and has very specific dimensions dictating the thickness versus the length of the arms.

Some observations for cross use:

  1. These are crosses not crucifixes and as such, must be symmetrical (really a plus sign)
  2. It is most strikingly used monochromatic and bold
  3. Textured white on white is really appealing
  4. Repetition is good, more is more

How stunning would these tiles be as a backsplash?

cross tiles

modwalls.com

Ready-made (and useful) art for the cottage or cabin. Hang one or two on the wall.

cross paddle

contactvoyagingco.com

The shape would lend itself to knitting really easily. This motif lends itself to DIY really well as an easy shape to work with and replicate.

cross pillow

jonathanadler.com

The Swiss cross can be really cute when personalized and used in the nursery.

cross baby items

etsy.com

Again, the repetition is what makes the most impact. You could easily replicate this with a jigsaw and plywood.

cross wall art

vtwonen.nl

The one exception to the black and white rule for swiss crosses is red. The original colour and the colour of Victorinox Swiss Army knives and the Red Cross.

missmustardseed

missmustardseed.com

kleenex box

etsy.com

Ideally suited to a spare Scandinavian design aesthetic this motif is a classic.

Fake a beach glass look

Are you landlocked but still want the look of beach glass?  I have found the easiest diy ever to fake the look of depression glass or beach glass using junk store glassware.

faux beach glass

Fake beach glass bowls

Using matte finish mode podge, food colouring and any glass vessel around you can easily create a pretty decorative piece. Certainly not for use with food but these would be lovely for display as a group at a beachy themed wedding or party.

I picked up a couple of very inexpensive pieces of glassware at Value Village. I think pieces with a lot of texture work best for this application but you can try any sort of finish. I mixed matte mode podge with food colouring drops until I got the colour I wanted and started painting. I applied two coats, letting the first dry for about an hour in between. That it! The finish is a lovely soft matte just like beach glass and imagine the variations in colour you can work with.

Beach glass bowls

 

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